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About Us

The Center for Hardware Assurance, Security, and Engineering (CHASE) was formed in 2012 to bring together commercial, academic and government expertise to enhance the nation’s hardware assurance and security.

Reliable hardware underpins virtually every aspect of our modern society, including transportation and utility infrastructures, financial and military systems, and the information systems supporting food, water, energy, manufacturing, aerospace, and health care activities. Yet our hardware is vulnerable to hazards such as fatigue and poor production quality, as well as myriad potential malicious activities, including the insertion of Trojan circuits (e.g., to act as ‘kill switches’ or backdoor to leak information), counterfeiting, integrated circuit (IC) and Intellectual Property (IP) piracy, extraction of sensitive data from an IC and systems using hardware-based side channels, malicious system disruption and diversion, tampering and insertion of counterfeit ICs into the supply chain.

CHASE will develop robust, secure, and trustworthy hardware technologies, design techniques, detection techniques, tools and policies to provide unprecedented assurance in modern ICs and systems. The resulting hardware will reinforce the reliability, trustworthiness, and economic value of existing and emerging secure, reliable and fault-tolerant computing, communication and networking technologies.

 

CHASE Center aims at developing comprehensive set of solutions to emerging security threats and assurance at transistor to system level. Transportation and utility infrastructures, financial and military systems, and the information systems supporting food, water, energy, manufacturing, aerospace, and health care activities are vulnerable to threats and issues, including:

  1. Counterfeit Electronics: Recycled, over-produced, cloned, defective, out-of-spec chips
  2. Tampering: Insertion of malicious circuitry called Trojan to act as ‘kill switches’ or backdoor to leak information and probing the chips for extracting sensitive data
  3. Security: Extraction of sensitive data from an IC and systems using hardware-based side channels, malicious system disruption and diversion using backdoors in hardware
  4. Reliability: Failure in the field due to particle strikes, device aging, hot-spots, etc.
  5. Quality: Electrical test and metrics for evaluating confidence and quality
  6. Risk Management and Analysis: Risk and decision analysis considering cost/benefit/confidence
  7. Emerging Threats: New threats, counterfeit trends, and attack

 

Distinguished Speaker: Donna Dodson of NIST
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SRC Joins CHASE
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Department of Defense Gives UConn Millions For Hardware Security
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UConn to lead $7.5 million research effort to improve security of nanoscale computer devices
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UConn, Comcast Join To Create Cybersecurity Program
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